Paranoid Operating System: Wearable Trackers

Wearable Trackers

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56394/aris2.v1i1.4

Keywords:

Communication, Wearables, Security, Operating Systems

Abstract

Throughout human evolution, communication has always played a central role in favor of the development and approximation of the species.  

Within this project, the main objective is to analyze different wearable devices (more specifically fitness tracking devices) with the intention of presenting the strengths and weaknesses related to the security and privacy frameworks that these devices make use of. 

To reach these objectives some devices will be acquired for testing, starting from the earliest point of the communication (Bluetooth connection) until the latter states (communications through the Internet). 

“Paranoid” operating systems and methodologies have been developed and studied over the years, both for mobile and desktop systems in order to maintain the security and anonymity of their users, and although related studies have been in existence for some time, this proposal aims to develop an answer to a theme not very distinct, but more specific and modern “Paranoid OS: Wearable Trackers”. 

It is with this purpose in mind that the path taken by this technology will be presented in this document, considering what are the communication protocols, what data goes through these communication channels and finally where is the user’s data. 

References

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Published

2021-12-30

How to Cite

[1]
A. Almeida, N. Mateus-Coelho, and N. Lopes, “Paranoid Operating System: Wearable Trackers: Wearable Trackers”, ARIS2-Journal, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 24–40, Dec. 2021.